PABRA introduces baked beans varieties to farmers

The Crops Research Institute of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CRI-CSIR), has introduced four new common bean (baked beans) varieties, for adoption by farmers.

The objective is that local farmers would be encouraged to cultivate the new varieties of the pulses – ‘Ennepa’, ‘Adoye’, ‘Nsoroma’ and ‘Semanhyia’, on a larger scale to enhance their livelihoods.

In pursuance of this objective, a field trip has been organized by the CRI-CSIR to enable selected farmers tour its Kwadaso Research Station in the Ashanti Region, to demonstrate the agronomic importance of the varieties.

They were exposed to the characteristics, yield potentials and commercial value of the exportable commodities, especially on the international market.

Common beans contain a variety of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients, providing protein, fiber, folate, iron, potassium and magnessium for the wellbeing of consumers.

Dr James Yaw Asibuo, National Coordinator for the Pan-African Bean Research Allaince (PABRA), in an interview with the Ghana News Agency (GNA), said the varieties were bred under the “Improving Bean Productivity and Market in Africa” project.

It is being spearheaded by PABRA and the International Centre for Tropical Agriculture.

So far, the collaborative institutions have supervised the cultivation of about 20 acres of common beans, on an experimental basis at the CRI-CSIR’s Research Stations, including Asante-Mampong, Akomadan and Fumesua.   

Researchers and scientists working on the project are elated about the success story, describing the release of the new common bean varieties as a breakthrough.

“This is due to the fact that those varieties alien to the West African terrain, have proven to thrive well on Ghanaian soil unlike other countries in the sub-Region still grappling to successfully cultivate those type of beans under a similar project,” Dr Asibuo said.

He said they were working with stakeholders at various levels to promote the commercial cultivation of common beans in the interest of the nation and farmers.

Dr Asibuo, who is a Principal Research Scientist of the CRI-CSIR and also the Steering Committee Chairman of the West and Central Africa Bean Research Network, said PABRA has adopted a bean corridor approach in its work across Africa.

This is to promote bean production, distribution and consumption nationally and regionally, stressing that there was a ready market for bean farmers.

Read the original version of this article here.

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